The Perfect Belgian Waffle Recipe

It used to be that Belgian waffles were a rarity, available mostly at restaurants. Belgian waffle irons weren’t readily available to consumers. Funny how things change. These days, Belgian waffle makers outnumber their standard waffle counterpart, making it easy for people to make this Belgian waffle recipe at home.

belgian waffles on a white plate, topped with fresh blueberries and strawberries

What’s the difference between a Belgian waffle and a regular waffle?

The thing that sets Belgian waffles and regular waffles apart is the size of the holes in the cooked waffle. A Belgian waffle iron has larger, deeper holes than a “regular” waffle iron. Belgian waffle makers have a grid that produces these deep holes, and they’re available in both round and square shapes.

What are Belgian waffles made of?

This is almost a trick question. Authentic Belgian waffles are made with a yeasted batter. That means the finished batter needs to sit for several hours or overnight before cooking, so it has a chance to rise. This Belgian waffle recipe has the large holes and crispy texture without the yeast. Instead of yeast, it’s leavened with baking powder. This recipe does not require the long wait time!

Why is it called a Belgian waffle?

Interestingly, there are two different kinds of waffles that hail from Belgium. The Belgian waffle was introduced to the USA at the 1964 World’s Fair in NYC by Maurice Vermersch. When served in Belgium, this waffle is eaten out of hand, without the sweet toppings (and utensils!) Americans associate with it. The Liege waffle is more dense and chewy, as well as sweeter.

belgian waffle recipe on a white plate, topped with fresh blueberries and strawberries

Making this Belgian waffle recipe

For a light and fluffy waffle, you’ll start by separating the egg yolks from the egg whites. Whip the egg whites using a hand mixer or stand mixer until stiff peaks form, combine with sugar, and then gently fold them into the remaining ingredients.

Cook these homemade waffles in a Belgian waffle maker, of course!

Belgian waffle ideas for serving:

belgian waffles on a white plate, topped with fresh blueberries and strawberries

An {Unauthentic} Yet Delicious Belgian Waffle Recipe

These crispy and light waffles can be served with sweet or savory toppings.
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Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 8 minutes
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to make waffles
Servings: 8
Calories: 2112kcal

Equipment

  • waffle iron

Ingredients

  • 3 large eggs separated
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups milk
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  • Using a stand or handheld mixer, beat egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  • Add sugar and mix for another minute or so.
  • Combine remaining ingredients (including egg yolkin a separate bowl and stir together, making sure to not over-stir.
    waffle ingredients in a clear bowl
  • Fold in the whipped egg whites, until just incorporated.
    folding egg whites into waffle batter
  • Pour the waffle batter into a waffle iron; cook according to manufacturer's instructions or follow these guidelines for making waffles.
  • Top as desired, with whipped topping, nuts, fruit, berries, syrup, etc.

Notes

Makes 6-8 waffles, depending on the size of your waffle iron.

Nutrition

Calories: 2112kcal | Carbohydrates: 271g | Protein: 61g | Fat: 86g | Saturated Fat: 58g | Cholesterol: 540mg | Sodium: 1578mg | Potassium: 2339mg | Fiber: 9g | Sugar: 51g | Vitamin A: 1503IU | Calcium: 1207mg | Iron: 16mg

Freezing waffles for later

Freeze leftover waffles for weekday breakfast in a hurry. You might even want to double the batch for this purpose. (One of the more brilliant ideas for Belgian waffle fans.)

Allow the cooked waffles to cool. Stack them with a piece of waxed paper between each to prevent sticking. Set waffles into a freezer safe container (one like this is perfect for round waffles) and freeze for up to two months.

To reheat, pop frozen waffles into a toaster (you may need to divide them into quarters) or a toaster oven and cook until they’re heated through and crispy.

Source: https://www.gounesco.com/the-history-of-the-belgian-waffle/

Thanks for sharing!
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